Tech Tools Teachers Can’t Live Without

…. in this remote and virtual world We asked a range of teachers “Which bit of software do you absolutely need to help you with remote teaching?” They’re top ten plus one answers were: Zoom – for video/voice face to face group calls 2. Storyboard – create visual boards for telling a story 3. Edpuzzle – lesson creating based on videos 4. Peardeck – use to create interactive lessons 5. Jamboard – interactive whiteboard system 6. Kami – applies interactivity to a document 7. Google Classroom – file sharing app for assignment sharing 8. Quizizz – gamified quiz maker 9.

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Routines

It is often identified as a characteristic of personal success to have a set routine each day, or even for each week (Monday is washing day, Tuesday is cleaning day). This creates momentum and ensures good things happen. Workers, sportspeople, entrepreneurs, business people are all said to go through their routine and this contributes to their success in whatever arena they put themselves. The daily routine can however be stifling. A worker who goes through their morning, afternoon and evening routine is often set in their way and while this M.O will get the job done – efficiently – it

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Fridays are Planning Days

The To-Do list is my favourite way of ensuring momentum is maintained each day. Things occur to me during the day and overnight, in the shower, and they need to be jotted down. It’s amazing how this creates such energy during the day – being able to tick off jobs done; tasks completed. I even do it for weekends and days’ off. The next level is to plan a week in advance. And I normally do that on a Friday afternoon. It clears the mind for the weekend and gives me a flying start on Mondays. After all, Friday afternoons

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Breaking the Rules

Every morning I go on a walk around our neighbourhood and the weekly bin day often throws up some interesting sights. Such a minor change to the landscape, but it’s a weekly event that’s always fraught. Often because people break the rules. But nothing wrong with these rules being broken, is there? Of course not. The bins get emptied (or they don’t) and there’s no victim here. I’ve often been restrained in the workplace because of rules and unwritten laws. More recently my impulses have taken over and I’ve started break these rules. I haven’t been breaking laws, or compliance

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Kraftwerk Radioactivity

Not sure what attracted this five-year-old to spend some time gazing at this Kraftwerk poster – but he did. Tracing the lines in and out from the centre to the edge and following the patterns forever. Bit like Kraftwerk themselves – mesmerising and absorbing. I gave this he five-year-old the poster when we met up in a park playing in the outdoors. Despite the park being a new play area, the poster took priority for a while. To make sense of the patterns of life is a primary desire and this desire is not always apparent. When the patterns are

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New7Wonders of the World

In 2000 a Swiss foundation launched a campaign to determine the New Seven Wonders of the World. Given that the original Seven Wonders list was compiled in the 2nd century —and that only one entrant is still standing (the Pyramids of Giza)—it seemed time for an update. And people around the world apparently agreed, as more than 100 million votes were cast on the Internet or by text messaging.   Explore each one of the New7Wonders with Google Maps, Google Earth, Google Street View and more. I have created a Google Site for a better student experience with a separate page of learning activities for each

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Exaggerating

The online meeting world is making actors out of us all. The exaggerated wave, the huge body guffaw, the overstated surprise face. It’s all part of communicating. In most meetings we need to stay on mute so that the noise isn’t too cacophonic. So we need to deploy an exaggerated body shape to send a message. It will be interesting returning to face to face meetings to see if the new behaviours remain.

The Still Life

I’m pretty much used to the lockdown life. The still life. I enjoy depending on my own resources and focussing on personal, private interests that energise me. My years in remote indigenous communities without TV, newspapers, before the internet, and in some instances, without power have entrenched an internal strength – and preference. It’s inevitable that writing, reading and thinking are my prime activities. Other are more artistic with inward expressions. Even in my childhood, we were an insular family who rejected most extended family and friend invites. No school friends were invited around because my Father had a home

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Church Going

I’ve just finished Julia Baird’s book Phosphoresence. One of the few books that I will re-read very soon. There are a few chapters in the book about her faith and the evolutions she has gone through with Christianity. Haven’t we all? Usually through one door, stay for a while and then out the exit never to revisit. But Julia finds more. She retells a story where she invited Helen Garner to come along to a service while they were both attending a Writer’s Festival. Julia had previously seen Helen at another series of Church services in Sydney. Helen was excited

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Typography 01 by Chris Do

I’ve been doing Chris Do’s Typography 01 Course over the last few days. It’s been great. I paid a three figure sum (you can see the price on the link) to get some information about something that I really enjoy. And from someone that has a bit of kudos in the world of design. According to others. The course isn’t tightly edited, super-slick or chock full of tightly packed content. In fact some parts of it are quite amateurish. Chis has a small live audience following him as he presents. They ask questions (some REALLY basic questions). Sometimes they get

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