I’m a knowledge worker.


Straddling both a day job and some entrepreneurial side gigs, I hold contrasting attitudes to work. During the day, those around me appreciate the time I put into the tasks at hand. They acknowledge my consistency and preparedness to turn up every day and provide an even steady solid contribution to the running of the Department. I model appropriate behaviour – mainly through attendance and timeliness.


On the other hand, my side gig clients pay me for the value I offer. They are generally not fussed with how long I take to do a job, and they are mainly concerned with how good is the result of my efforts. Does it enhance their work? Does my work make them look good? Do my efforts add to their business or their work?


By day, it is about the time put in; after hours, it’s about the value I provide.


In my day job, some workers are not as highly regarded by their colleagues because they focus on bringing value and disregard time. They work different hours, intermittently and sometimes erratically, and their contribution, in contrast, is often well regarded by their customers.


The knowledge workers who treasure their time – clock on, take set breaks, avoid after-hours participation – seem to experience limited career opportunities.


The knowledge workers who provide value and regard the importance of consistency are the ones who excel.

You know who they are.